Strategic Planning and Innovation Management

Visit Tutorial Page ( Report)
Develop the essential skills for planning and executing strategy and for managing ideas and the innovation process. These skills are guaranteed to increase performance and quality, make your organization a better place to work, and help you become a more successful manager. Learn how to build an innovation community capable of transforming any organisation into a great place to work. This course draws on best practice within world leading organizations to present you with a step by step approach for planning and executing effective change. Class projects will help you practice what you learn. Carefully designed templates will allow you to effortlessly create strategic and operational plans within your own organization. Who is the target audience? Managers at all levels in any organization Team leaders and also team members
  • Managing Change
    00:56:40
    • Introduction

      Many organisations are large enough to have many innovation teams that deal with various aspects of product, process and service innovation. Indeed it is argued in this course that each department in such an organization is an innovation team. In addition, organizations have suppliers, distributors and other strategic partners that work with the organization in providing products and services to customers. These other organizations can also have their own innovation teams. One way of visualizing this extended innovation is to use the innovation funnel where there will be many innovation funnels throughout the extended enterprise.

      00:20:26
      • Slides, Reading and Templates
        00:00:02
      • Planning Change
        00:18:45
  • Defining Goals
    00:53:41
    • Understanding Requirements

      Every organization has its own way or method of defining goals. In this course we will look at four main types of goals. These goals are labelled statements, requirements, objectives and indicators. We also look at environment analysis that informs the goal definition process using techniques such as benchmarking, checklists and SWOT. We conclude this class by looking at the data structure of statements. The purpose of looking at data structure is to begin the process of building and knowledge management system for the management of innovation. Download course book here.

      00:17:36
    • Defining Objectives

      Strategic planning has become a popular technique for most organizations in defining organizational goals. The process of strategic planning involves defining key thrusts around which change and innovation will take place and then identifying key objectives within each thrust. The types of thrust vary significantly between organizations. However, there are some thrusts which are common and can be initially used by any organisation and then later adapted. There are an equally varied number of objectives that an organization can define. Download course book here.

      00:17:36
    • Measuring Performance

      Performance indicators are a measurable way of defining goals. Performance targets set goals in the future. They also monitor current progress towards those future goals and they provide a historical perspective on performance in the past. Indicators can be financial and non-financial. Financial indicators, such as measures of revenues and cost, have been popular in the past. An organization’s worth is often measured by financial measures such as turnover and profits. This is no longer the case, with almost every organization worth significantly more than its financial indicators indicate. This is because organizations are now measured in terms of their potential as knowledge organizations. A knowledge based organization can innovate — change its products, processes and services — in response to changing market demands. Most performance indicators are now non-financial such as measuring absenteeism, rate of idea generation, success of new products and so on. Download course book here.

      00:18:29
  • Managing Actions
    00:47:34
    • Generating Ideas

      Ideas occur during the problem solving process and when individuals are held responsible for achieving goals. Serendipity is where an idea appears in the right place and at the right time. It is an unexpected and fortunate discovery. However, most ideas are planned. They occur as a result of a planned set of activities such as problem identification, brainstorming and ranking. Good ideas go on to become projects and projects that require resources — time, labour and money — and also need to be scheduled. Some ideas can be implemented immediately with very little resources. These are sometimes called ‘quick wins’. Download course book here.

      00:16:30
    • Managing Projects

      Some good ideas can be implemented immediately as quick wins, others that require significant resources can become projects. Projects are non-permanent goal centred actions with a predefined start date and due date. Projects are unique — no two projects will ever be the same. They have leaders and teams. Every organization typically has a number of projects. It is beyond the scope of this section to discuss project management in detail. What is presented below are the salient features of managing projects within the overall context of managing goals, actions, teams, results and community. Download course book here

      00:18:03
    • Managing Portfolios

      A group of projects is called a portfolio. Most organizations have a group of projects that they’re working on as part of their innovation program. These projects will have various start dates, durations, due dates and so on. A portfolio of projects is sometimes called a program or a plan. One of the key issues in managing a portfolio is scoring and ranking of projects. As investment budgets increase or decrease, the position of the project in the overall ranking determines whether it will be implemented or not. This section deals with some of the important issues around managing portfolios of projects. The key differences between project and portfolio management are that portfolio management involves the balancing of resources across many different projects, the achievement of organizational goals rather than individual project goals, and managing the portfolio as a whole. Download course book here

      00:13:01
  • Empowering Teams
    00:36:12
    • Leading Change

      Leadership is the ability to influence a group towards the achievement of well-defined, communicated and accepted goals. Many actions occur from the bottom up i.e. ideas are generated by engineers, specialists and users of a particular product, process or service. What stimulates this activity is a combination of leadership skills that include creating a culture of innovation, keeping the focus of the strategic goals of the organisation, empowering others to act on the goals and resolving conflicts as soon as they arise. These skills are not easy to attain and often require many years of training and experience. Over the years, leaders will develop a specific style that can foster and promote innovation. This class looks at leadership styles that, once practiced by experienced managers, can foster an innovation culture within organisations. Download course book here.

      00:17:38
    • Empowering Teams

      Most organizations now operate a type of matrix organizational structure where individuals report on a permanent basis to functional departments but also report on a temporary basis to project organizations. Functional departments are examples of permanent teams. Once they are formed and structured they can last for many years. Project organisations on the other hand are non-permanent teams. Project organizations only last for the duration of the project. The Innovation process requires both types of teams. The terms ‘team’ and ‘organisation’ are interchangeable. This class looks at teams and how they are used to stimulate, plan, execute and control an innovation plan. Download course book here.

      00:18:34
  • Monitoring Results
    00:35:34
    • Monitoring Results

      One of the primary causes of failure in the innovation process is poor monitoring of results. This class looks at ways of communicating the results of goals, actions and teams in any organisation. The basic principle is to share information of use to each individual involved in the team. Any information that is only of use to one or a subset of individuals needs to be treated separately. Focusing on information of use to the team as a whole avoids cluttering valuable communications channels, wasting valuable time and creating ‘communications noise’ that distracts the team from important decisions. Reporting usually takes place over particular periods, e.g. weeks or months, and is usually accompanied by bilateral, subgroup and full team meetings. It is at these meetings that results can be discussed and any future actions agreed that help the organisation to meet its objectives. Download course book here

      00:17:24
    • Building Communities

      Many organisations are large enough to have many innovation teams that deal with various aspects of product, process and service innovation. Indeed it is argued in this course that each department in such an organization is an innovation team. In addition, organizations have suppliers, distributors and other strategic partners that work with the organization in providing products and services to customers. These other organizations can also have their own innovation teams. One way of visualizing this extended innovation is to use the innovation funnel where there will be many innovation funnels throughout the extended enterprise and where some funnels will be the parent or child of another. Download course book here. Building Communities

      00:18:10
Write Your Review

Reviews